(Photo by Thomas Martinsen on Unsplash)

Volcanic wines have been around for a while now, but it seems that it is only in the last year or two that they have really taken off.

Wines from places like Etna, Santorini and Soave have seen a growing interest of late. Is it just the evocative image of volcanoes, and consumers trying out the latest trend, or is there really something to volcanic wines?

What is a volcanic wine?
Volcanic wines are wines made from grapes grown in volcanic regions in volcanic soil.
As there are many different types of volcanic soil, with different types of rock and different mineral compositions it is hard to pinpoint exactly which characteristics of the wine would be considered volcanic. This said, volcanic wines are often noted for their depth and complexity.

How does that make a difference?
Volcanic soil often has higher mineral concentrations than non-volcanic soil, which impacts the flavour. Also, newer volcanic soils have not yet had as much time to change from their volcanic forms. This usually results in a soil that holds less moisture, which means that the vines produce smaller grapes which can concentrate their flavours.

Does it really taste better?
Due to their popularity and the reviews of wine experts, you would expect them to taste superior to a non-volcanic wine, but the only way to really know is to decide for yourself.
If you are interested in trying one, this article from the Independent (https://www.independent.co.uk/extras/indybest/food-drink/wine/volcanic-soil-wines-vinupetra-etna-nerominiera-etna-rosso-vermentino-di-sardegna-a8385946.html) recommends their pick of 8 volcanic wines from different regions.

Whatever wine you prefer to drink, we offer a variety of wine storage systems to ensure that you can enjoy your wine in its optimum condition. Take a look at our wide variety of cabinets and other equipment online, or contact us for a bespoke wine cellar solution.

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