The Wine Buying Experience

Is the Key to Effective & Profitable Sales

 

Whether you’re on the market for a luxury car, a beautiful piece of clothing or

a nice meal from a supermarket for that Saturday night in, we can often be persuaded to

spend more than we originally intended if the purchasing environment is both exciting and enticing;

it’s a much about the buying experience as it is about the actual product –

and purchasing a bottle of wine is no different.

 

With all of us faced with a degree of economic uncertainty, its only persuasive – ‘sexy’ marketing that will get us

to part with a few more of our ‘hard earned’ for that premium bottle of wine.

Given this, it always bemuses me as to why so many supermarkets give so little thought as to how

their wine is displayed.

 

More often than not, there are simply long shelves of wines – even whites and rose’s, all huddled and

jumbled together in un favorable conditions with little regard to origin, quality or price point.

Customers are simply bewildered and confused as to what to choose or simply can’t afford the time or

patience to stop and read all the labels in order to make a ‘semi’ informed choice.

The purchase is most often made on the basis of ‘I guess that will do – it’s about the right price’ rather than

a decision based on quality.

 

By selling wine in this fashion, not only are supermarkets missing out on emotive, up-selling opportunities,

but also, they continually run the risk of stock damage and wine wastage through poor storage.

 

Investment in proper wine cellars and chillers would allow for correct storage at optimum temperatures

whilst affording them the opportunity to showcase and add appeal to more expensive wine varieties.

This principal is well proven with food. Ask yourself how often you have upgraded and spent a few extra pounds

on the more attractive ‘taste the difference’ display’s?

 

Similar criticism’s can be applied to hotels and restaurants where we are simply handed a printed wine list.

To all but the wine connoisseurs amongst us, the vast majority of the list – with its brief one line description,

means very little and choice is based on what we feel to be a ‘safe’ and ‘comfortable’ option,

based on price point and limited knowledge.

If we were walked over to a well lit, beautifully displayed wine cellar or chiller and told about the different wines, we would almost certainly spend more.

 

To up-sell requires investment as well as effort in terms of educating staff.

In an increasingly difficult and competitive market only a combination of knowledge,

persuasive point of sale and investment in proper display – storage equipment will see strong,

profitable sales growth from the wine buying public.

Irwen Martin – Managing Director of ‘Wine Corner’

 

www.winecorner.co.uk